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IF YOU LISTEN, NATURE SINGS, 
IN THE TREES, ON FEATHERED WINGS. 

BIRD SONG ID

Ever wondered who's singing that catchy tune outside your window in the morning?  Whether it's the cheerful chirp of a robin or the melodic whistle of a blackbird, each bird has its own unique sound. 

Blackbird

Image by Rainhard Wiesinger

Birdsong Description: Starts with a series of clear, flute-like notes followed by a varied combination of trills, warbles, and whistles. The song is typically delivered from a high perch and can vary in complexity, but it's generally characterised by its pleasant, lyrical quality.

LISTEN

Blackbird
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David Bissett, XC318977. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/318977

Most likely to hear: Throughout the year. Male blackbirds are particularly vocal during breeding season which is March-July. 

Blue tit

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Birdsong Description: It often starts with a series of rapid "tee-tee-tee" followed by lower "tsee-tsee-tsee" calls. It's a cheerful and energetic song.

LISTEN

Blue Tit
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Andrew Edwards, XC785546. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/785546

Most likely to hear: Males sing from February through to the end of the breeding period in June.

Brambling

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Birdsong Description: The Brambling's song is a very short repeated ‘rrryuh’. Call notes are a hard loud nasal ‘tea-ep’, sometimes repeated 3 or 4 times.

LISTEN

BramblingSong
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Tero Linjama, XC897546. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/897546

BramblingCall
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Romuald Mikusek, XC891014. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/891014

Most likely to hear: November - March. Bramblings are migratory birds from Scandinavia and Russia who visit us for the winter. 

Cuckoo

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Birdsong Description: A distinctive and simple two-note call, often described as "cu-coo" or "coo-coo," with the first note slightly higher in pitch than the second.

LISTEN

Cuckoo
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David Farrow, XC37447. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/37447

Most likely to hear: Spring as the male cuckoos use this call to establish territories and attract females. 

Curlew

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Birdsong Description: Song often starts with a low, whistled "prreee" and then builds into a series of repeated "prrreeep" or "prrreeerr" calls, which can vary slightly in pitch and intensity. It's a distinctive and recognisable sound.

Most likely to hear: Breeding season which is March-July. You can find curlews in wetland and moorlands in the north of the UK, but they migrate throughout the island to the coast for winter. 

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